Summary: A new study shows that Americans are heeding the advice to get more exercise yet are not making a dent in the obesity rate. TrekDesk Treadmill Desk offers a potential solution.  

It may sound counterintuitive but Americans are actually exercising more according to a recent study however the nation’s obesity rate continues to increase. Confused?  It turns out that one of the problems may be in the definition of exercise. TrekDesk Treadmill Desk offers a solution to the problem.

Data published this month from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health and Metrics and Evaluation showed that more than 2/3 of the nations counties (including some of the most previously inactive) increased their average physical activity levels over the past decade. That’s the good news. Conversely obesity rates fell only in a total of nine counties nationwide. Women’s activity levels jumped the highest from 2001-2009 from 46.7% to 51.3% with men overall moving up one percentage point keeping the lead at 57.8%. Sufficient physical activity was defined as 150 minutes of moderate activity or half of that amount of vigorous activity. But is this definition of physical activity adequate?

Dr. Christopher Murray, principal leader of the research, published in the journal Population Health Metrics (http://www.pophealthmetrics.com/content/11/1/7/abstract) summed up the dilemma. “There has been a lot of progress on physical activity,” said “To tackle obesity, we need to do this. But we probably also need to do more. … Just counting on physical activity is not going to be the solution.”  

A separate paper published by the Institute recently cast poor diet as the number one factor contributing to America’s poor health record. TrekDesk Treadmill Desk believes one critical component to the dilemma has been left off the radar screen: the increase in total daily sedentarism.

“While many people lament an inability to shed pounds despite a daily diet/exercise regimen, few recognize the inter-relationship and health hazards due to their daily totals of inactivity,” stated Steve Bordley, CEO of TrekDesk Treadmill Desk.  

Studies have already shown that the body shuts off important enzymes and processes involved in weight loss and overall health when individuals sit for extended periods during the day. “A daily trip to the gym while beneficial in some health respects is rapidly unwound when it is coupled with hours sitting at a desk, couch or long commute,” Bordley added.

TrekDesk has joined ranks with many academics and medical professionals urging that the total number of sedentary hours be added as a health metric to every individual’s health profile and that a Movement Revolution be promoted educating Americans to the importance of staying in motion through out the day.

Designed to fit any existing treadmill, TrekDesk treadmill desk is an affordable, full sized, height adjustable workstation that allows individuals the opportunity to gain the necessary amount of daily exercise to lose weight, maintain health, reduce stress, prevent disease, strengthen muscles, boost mood and productivity, without requiring additional time during the day or extra motivation.