Yet another reason to use a treadmill desk to prevent obesity: heart health.

Boston Herald:By Darren Garnick- the Working Stiff

With many of us treating our gyms like nonprofit organizations - making monthly donations with no services in return - it is an appealing proposition to have work and workout time become one and the same.


Diana Nyad and Bonnie Stoll, the personal trainers for Desperate Housewives star Marcia Cross, urge us all to do The Office Six, a sequence of one-minute exercises that can be done in your cubicle. On ABC Good Morning America,  they recently demonstrated desk push-ups, butt kicks and chicken wings, an elbow-flapping routine done behind your back.


Disciples of Six are supposed to say to themselves, I'm going to flex this butt as hard as I can.

On YouTube, attractive office yoga instructor Leta Koontz demonstrates a chest-stretching exercise while wearing a tight pink turtleneck. Trained at the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in India, the guru suggests that sticking her chest in the air is the perfect remedy for when her “focus is beginning to waver.


So far, office exercise seems like a recipe for sexual harassment.
Nevertheless, these workouts are far preferable to no movement at all. I once worked in an office where my co-workers and I were blissfully aware of how infrequently we were required to leave our swivel chairs. In a post-ironic act of defiance, we had one day when we all tried to stay in them as much as possible - even wheeling ourselves to the entrance of the bathrooms.


That job didnt pay very well, but ah, the memories.
It is truly frightening to consider how much white-collar work breeds inertia and lethargy. So much so that some people are willing to act like baboons by replacing their chairs with big exercise balls. Is there any way not to come across as hyper when you plant your rear end on a bouncy balloon?


Only slightly more sophisticated are the treadmill desks, which range from a $49 build-your-own plywood and foam model to a $4,999 Steelcase WalkStation that comes with an arctic white, maple or cherry wood laminate finish.


Mayo Clinic researchers claim that these conveyor belts can transform obese office workers into slim bodies by replacing only two or three hours of sitting computer time each day (resulting in a loss of 44 to 66 pounds a year). The amazing part of the equation is that the walking is done at one mile an hour, not even enough to break out a sweat.


Exercise entrepreneur Steve Bordley is expected to unveil his TrekDesk,an adjustable, free-standing desk that straddles any treadmill. He boldly promises that his desk will not only hold your laptop but also lower cancer risk and prevent dementia.


"Bad things happen when we sit," says Bordley."Our bodies weren't designed to sit for 14 hours a day.How many times do you walk down the hall and talk to someone about a project? he adds, dismissing the idea that workers will feel silly on a treadmill. "It's the same thing."


Plus, with no butt flexing or chest stretching, there's less paperwork for human resources to fill out, too.