General Health

Sitting at an Office Desk Increases Risk of Diabetes, Heart Disease and Premature Death 200%

Summary: A new study conducted at the University of Leicester, in association with Loughborough University, discovered that sitting for extended periods of time during the day significantly increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease and mortality. TrekDesk treadmill desk offers a solution to stay active during the day.

New research has shown, once again, that individuals sitting for extended durations have a 200% increased risk of diabetes, heart-disease and death independent of regular exercise habits. TrekDesk treadmill desk offers a unique solution to keep employees healthy and moving during the day.

18 studies totaling 794,577 participants were analyzed by researchers at the Diabetes Research Group at the University of Leicester and colleagues from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit.

The study was published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association of the Study of Diabetes.

As found in previous studies, the negative impact on health from daily inactivity was independent of individual physical exercise. Translation? A daily trip to the gym is not enough to undo the health damage caused by sitting all day at the office.

Lead researcher, Dr Wilmot, of the Leicester Diabetes Centre, stated that an average adult sits 50-70% of their day. Limiting these sedentary periods would risk of diabetes, heart disease and premature death.

“Combating the risk of sedentary lifestyles is exactly what the TrekDesk was designed to accomplish,” stated Steve Bordley, CEO of TrekDesk Treadmill Desk.

In a press release Issued by University of Dr Wilmot, a Clinical Research Fellow in Diabetes and Endocrinology based at the Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, said:

“Our study also showed that the most consistent associations were between sitting and diabetes. This is an important message because people with risk factors for diabetes, such as the obese, those of South Asian ethnic origin, or those with a family history of diabetes, may be able to help reduce their future risk of diabetes by limiting the time spent sitting. ”


Professor Melanie Davies, Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Leicester and honorary consultant at University Hospitals of Leicester is a co-investigator and Director of the NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit further added, “This paper has a very important message for the public but also for health care professionals - namely that being sedentary is common and dangerous for our long term health, particularly for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and that this link appears to be over and above other lifestyle factors such as our diet and physical activity.”


“Inactivity is a serious health concern in today’s society,” summarized Bordley, “this study adds to an extensive body of evidence that an employee’s health is dependent upon staying in motion through out the day.”